Julayne Lee

Julayne Lee was given up for adoption in South Korea as a result of the Korean War. She was adopted by an all-white Christian family in Minnesota, where she grew up. She has spent over fifteen years working with Overseas Adopted Koreans (OAKs). She lived in Seoul and now resides in Los Angeles, where she is a member of the LA Futbolistas and Adoptee Solidarity Korea - Los Angeles (ASK-LA). She is also part of the Adoptee Rights Campaign working to pass the Adoptee Citizenship Act to ensure all inter-country adoptees have US citizenship. NOT MY WHITE SAVIOR is her first book.

AAPI Women: University of Michigan
Mar
25
7:00 AM07:00

AAPI Women: University of Michigan

I’ll be speaking with Emily P. Lawsin’s class AAPI Women. If you’re interested in having me visit your campus and speak to your class or student group, please email julayne@julaynelee.com

Not My White Savior has been taught globally in Freshman Lit, Race & Ethnicity and AAPI Women university courses.

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AWP: F337 Adoptee/Adopted People & Foster Alum Reception
Mar
29
6:30 PM18:30

AWP: F337 Adoptee/Adopted People & Foster Alum Reception

Are you an adoptee/adopted person or foster alum? Have you felt silenced in your family and/or in the adoption and foster discourse? This reception aims to be a safer space, recognizing that while we have shared experiences, the adoption and foster journeys are unique and very individual. Come meet others who would like to shift the narrative and flip the script on a system that has failed far too many. We'll discuss how writing has empowered us to share our truth and navigate the complex emotions of institutions that have historically portrayed only a positive point of view, contributing to the silencing of our voices.

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AWP Reading: S281 Adopted Korean Women Writers
Mar
30
4:30 PM16:30

AWP Reading: S281 Adopted Korean Women Writers

Adopted Korean Women Writers: History Shapes Our Writing Journey (exact date/time TBA)

Overseas adopted Korean American women will read their poetry, memoirs and essays that document their collective experiences.  With adoption from South Korea linked to the rights of unwed mothers and also foreign policy including North Korea relations, adopted Korean writers contribute important documentation and discourse to shift the narrative and dialogue and bring attention to the history and current conditions surrounding inter-country adoption (ICA) from South Korea.

 

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Adopting Resilience, Fostering the Spirit of Creativity Festival
Apr
12
to Apr 13

Adopting Resilience, Fostering the Spirit of Creativity Festival

  • Highways Performance Space (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This event will give purpose and voice, utilizing the expressive arts in all mediums to bring awareness to foster care and adoption. All funds raised will go to support the event, the artists, and Celia Center programs

PERFORMING ARTISTS FEATURED

Born, Never Asked by Zoe Klein Productions is an acrobatic dance journey of a Colombian adoptee’s search for belonging and sheds light on the complexity of international adoption through acrobatics, dance, spoken word, and visual imagery.

Susan Harris O’Connor recites The Harris Narratives

Jeanette Yoffe performs scenes from What’s Your Name, Who’s Your Daddy?

Denise Schnelle recites BIRTHMOTHER

Julayne Lee, Korean American Poet, Adoptee

Julia Miller Dunnett, Teen Singer, Adoptee

Nicole Rademacher, Artist Presents a Film, Adoptee

Briana Spencer, Spoken Word, Foster Alumni

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Apr
22
7:00 PM19:00

Ed Bok Lee, Franny Choi and Julayne Lee

We're teaming up with Clarion Performing Arts Center, once again, to host the book releases of Franny Choi's "Soft Science" and Ed Bok Lee's Mitochondrial Night. Franny and Ed will be reading from their new collections along with special guest, Julayne Lee, author of "Not My White Savior"! 

FEATURES

Franny Choi is the author of two poetry collections, Soft Science (Alice James Books, 2019) and Floating, Brilliant, Gone (Write Bloody, 2014), as well as a chapbook, Death by Sex Machine (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017). Her poems have appeared in Poetry Magazine, Paris Review, American Poetry Review, and elsewhere. She is a Kundiman Fellow, Senior News Editor for Hyphen Magazine, co-host of the podcast VS, and member of the Dark Noise Collective. She lives in Hamtramck, MI and teaches poetry through Inside Out Literary Arts.

Ed Bok Lee is the author of three books of poetry, most recently Mitochondrial Night (Coffee House Press, March 2019). The son of North and South Korean emigrants—his mother originally a refugee from what is now North Korea; his father was raised during the Japanese colonial period and Korean War in what is now South Korea, Lee grew up in South Korea, North Dakota, and Minnesota, and was educated there and later on both U.S. coasts, Russia, South Korea, and Kazakhstan. He teaches at Metropolitan State University in Saint Paul, and also works as an artist, translator, and for two decades has taught in programs for youth and the incarcerated. Honors include the American Book Award, Minnesota Book Award, Asian American Literary Award (Members’ Choice), and a PEN/Open Book Award. www.edboklee.com

Julayne Lee is an overseas adopted Korean American poet, essayist, artivist, art curator and producer. Her debut collection of poems Not My White Savior (2018, Rare Bird) was on Bitch Media's Bitchreads: 15 Books Feminists Should Read in March and Entropy's Best of 2018: Best Poetry Books & Poetry Collections. Not My White Savior has been taught globally in Freshman Lit and Race & Ethnicity university courses. A Las Dos Brujas and VONA alum, Julayne has read and spoken on adoption at universities and symposiums throughout the U.S. & Korea and has an MAEd from Hamline University. @julayneelle www.julaynelee.com

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Transracial and Transnational Korean Adoption: Creating Happy Families or Child Trafficking?
Mar
16
11:30 AM11:30

Transracial and Transnational Korean Adoption: Creating Happy Families or Child Trafficking?

1:45PM - 2:45PM: Transracial and Transnational Korean Adoption: Creating Happy Families or Child Trafficking?

Adoption has long been framed as a means to create a family and in some cases save children from third world countries and women deemed unfit for motherhood, many of whom are women of color. Has the white savior narrative turned what once began as a humanitarian effort into a guise for child trafficking? How has the adoption industry continued to thrive and profit while failing those most vulnerable in the adoption constellation? Why not provide resources for women to keep their children rather than separating them through adoption. By telling the whole adoption story, which includes adoptees without citizenship, their deportation and legislative efforts to fix this human rights catastrophe, this session aims to shift the historical narrative.

11:30AM - 12:30PM: Healing Through The Unsaid

Silencing does not benefit the silenced. How has silence keep us from becoming who we are really meant to be? What have you kept silent and why? Through a series of writing prompts including letter writing, we’ll make space for our experiences that have been silenced and have held us back from being who we were destined to be.

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Crossing Korea: Eugenia Kim, Alice Stephens, and Julayne Lee at the Asian American Writers' Workshop (AAWW)
Nov
8
7:00 PM19:00

Crossing Korea: Eugenia Kim, Alice Stephens, and Julayne Lee at the Asian American Writers' Workshop (AAWW)

I’ll be reading with Eugenia Kim, author of the novels The Kinship of Secrets (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, November 2018) and The Calligrapher’s Daughter (Holt, Henry & Company, Inc., 2010) and Alice Stephens author of the debut novel Famous Adopted People (Unnamed Press, October 2018).

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AKA Adoptee Forum | Our Words: A Writing & Expression Workshop
Sep
17
6:45 PM18:45

AKA Adoptee Forum | Our Words: A Writing & Expression Workshop

Healing Through Writing the Unsaid

Our voices matter, yet are often silenced by adoption and/or whiteness and sometimes this occurs within our own adoptive families. Through writing & discussion, we’ll reflect on our journeys as adopted people of color and how we navigate our identities. You’ll have the opportunity to share your writing with others in the workshop if you so choose (sharing is optional). No writing experience necessary

WHO: Anyone who identifies as an adopted person of color, indigenous adopted person, or as a racially ambiguous adopted person (18 yrs. and older) 
WHEN: Monday September 17th 6:45pm - 8:45pm
WHERE: TBD
COST: FREE for members; $5 suggested donation for non-members
BRING: your own writing materials - paper, notebook, journal and pens, pencils; your own beverages and snacks - writing can make you hungry! an open mind and heart - your voice matters.
RSVP: PM Bianca Kuijper or email bkuijper@alsoknownas.org to RSVP and for questions

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RAPP SALOON READING SERIES
Jun
1
8:30 PM20:30

RAPP SALOON READING SERIES

Rapp Saloon Reading Series First Fridays is proud to feature Poets Conney WilliamsDanielle Mitchell, Julayne Lee (JE Lee), and Musician Weston Cann at our Friday, June 1, 2018 event! Host: Cynthia Alessandra Briano. +OPEN MIC (Sign up: 8-8:30pm.) Reading Begins: 8:30pm. Free. Reception with book signing and refreshments to follow!

Join us for a night of poetry, literature, music, theater, comedy, and dance at the historic Rapp Saloon in Santa Monica! Share your words and music for the Open Mic! All voices and arts welcome. You are welcome to contribute something to the refreshments table. Parking directly across the street at Parking Structure #6 or take the Metro Expo Line to Downtown Santa Monica Station. Great thanks to HI Los Angeles Santa Monica Hostel for hosting us! www.rappsaloon.org Twitter: @RappSaloon, Instagram: rappsaloon

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